Title

Ce

Locust Grove & Vicinity Timeline

 INTRODUCTION:  The Haldeman Mansion is on a rise overlooking the mouth of the Conoy Creek and east bank of the Susquehanna River in northwestern Lancaster County, PA.  It is the heart of what has been known as Locust Grove since at least the early 1800?s.  It is part of what was John Galbraith Jr.?s 440 acre+ land warrant from the William Penn Family.  A warrant that stretched from the bank of the river inland in a north easterly direction for over a mile.  It encompassed the Conoy Creek up to a present day village known as Stackstown.  These lands and those warranted to the immediate north (by Jonah Davenport & James Logan), immediate east (by Alexander Hutchinson & James Cook) and immediate south (by George Miranda & Samuel Smith) provide a microcosm of colonial activity and influence, which was fostered by their proximity to early Indian occupations, river ferries and a year-around supply of water power.  The history of Locust Grove and the mansion property includes Indian settlements and traders, farming, manufacturing and quarrying.  Peter's Road (an early indian traders' path), the Pennsylvania Canal and Railroad traversed the property and contributed to the business and political success of its prominent owners from pre-colonial times well into the 20th Century.


Note: Dates marked with an asterisk (*) indicate the acquisition or transfer of land on which the Haldeman mansion is located, from the original purchase from the William Penn Family to the Haldeman Mansion Preservation Society.  The deeds cited within this timeline can be accessed at the website of the Lancaster County Courthouse: http://icris.lancasterdeeds.com/.  The process for acquiring ownership during the colonial period in Pennsylvania required several steps:  Application - a request for a warrant to have a survey made; Warrant - certificate authorizing a survey of a tract of land; Survey - sketch of boundaries of tract of land with exact determination of total acreage; Return - internal document sent from Surveyor General to Secretary of the Land Office; and Patent - final, official deed from the Penns which conveyed clear title and all rights. All warrants and subsequent surveys and deeds were to include a six percent allowance for roads and highways. 

For Additional Information - CLICK on the HIGHLIGHTED WORDS.
Click to edit table header
 Archaeological research has revealed a distinct woodland culture that thrived in the Lower Susquehanna Valley in the Late Woodland Period from approximately A.D. 1200 to A.D. 1550. These early residents of the Susquehanna River's banks and territory farther inland are known as the Shenks Ferry Indians. They got their name from the location of their archaeological discovery in the 1950s.  Shenks Ferry Indians generally lived in small hamlets along the river and inland along the river's main tributaries.

  Source: ?Along the Susquehanna, A Virtual Exhibit?; Lancaster County's Historical Society; Lancaster, PA; LancasterHistory.org, 2010
1200
 to 
1550
  Archaeological research has revealed a distinct woodland culture that thrived in the Lower Susquehanna Valley in the Late Woodland Period from approximately A.D. 1200 to A.D. 1550. These early residents of the Susquehanna River's banks and territory farther inland are known as the Shenks Ferry Indians. They got their name from the location of their archaeological discovery in the 1950s.  Shenks Ferry Indians generally lived in small hamlets along the river and inland along the river's main tributaries.

  Source: ?Along the Susquehanna, A Virtual Exhibit?; Lancaster County's Historical Society; Lancaster, PA; LancasterHistory.org, 2010
About
1550 
 This is thought to be the approximate time that a small group of Shenk Ferry People built and occupied a small double stockaded village near the mouth of the Conoy Creek.  In may have been inhabited until about 1550.

  Source: Susquehanna's Indians, By Barry C. Kent, PA Historical & Museum Commission, 1989.
About
1575  
 The Susquehannock Indians began to aggressively replace the established Shenks Ferry Indians in the Lower Susquehanna River Valley. The tribe's first contact with European settlers came in 1608 when Captain John Smith explored the Chesapeake Bay and met sixty Susquehannock warriors.  European contact grew substantially and by the 1640s the Susquehannocks found themselves in an advantageous position as participants in the booming fur trade.

  Source: Along the Susquehanna, A Virtual Exhibit; Lancaster County's Historical Society; Lancaster, PA; LancasterHistory.org, 2010.
1625
 to
1645
 Suggested dates when there was thought to be a sizeable Susquehannock village at the site of the former Billmeyer limestone quarry less than a mile below Locust Grove, along the east bank of the Susquehanna River.

  Source: Susquehanna's Indians, By Barry C. Kent, PA Historical & Museum Com., 1989. Pages 342-345.
  1640
 Approximate date the large oak tree between the Haldeman Mansion and Conoy Creek took root.By the 1650s, the Susquehannocks found themselves surrounded by enemies ? the Iroquois to the north and increasing European pressure to the south. The power of the Susquehannocks suffered after a smallpox epidemic decimated the tribe and, by the 1670s, the few remaining Susquehannocks fled to a new home in Maryland or were absorbed into the Iroquois tribe. 

Source: Along the Susquehanna, A Virtual Exhibit; Lancaster County's Historical Society; Lancaster, PA; LancasterHistory.org, 2010.
 Chester County, one of three original Pennsylvania counties, was created by William Penn.  It became the administrative territory covering present day Locust Grove.

 
 Conestoga Township created within Chester County.  It became the "local" administrative territory covering present day Locust Grove.

 
 A Conoy Indian Town was established on a prominent point of land on the south side of Conoy Creek a short distance from its mouth. In 1970 when archeological investigations were carried out, parts of the sites were separately owned by Vernon Hixon and J. E. Baker Co.  S.S. Haldeman (1812-1880), who lived literally on one corner of the Conoy Cemetery, collected on the village area in the mid-1800's. Source: Susquehanna's Indians, By Barry C. Kent, PA Hist. & Museum Comm., 1989, p. 391.   It is thought the Conoys arrived overtime, not all at once, and that they were a refugee group with members of various tribes relocating to the site.  "Conoy Indian Town & Peter Bezaillion", David H. Landis, Papers Read Before the Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol 37, No. 5, Lancaster, PA, 1933.  The Conoy site at Bainbridge is of the Refugee Phase, after the Beaver Wars and the departure/demise of the Susquehannocks.  The village?s composition probably included a mix of Seneca, displaced Algonquin groups from the eastern shore of Maryland and Delaware, a few whites who had intermarried as well as a few Susquehannocks.  Estimates place the population at about 130.

  Source: Susquehanna's Indians, By Barry C. Kent, PA Hist. & Museum Comm., 1989, p. 401.
 
 On this date, a marauding party of Iroquois stopped at Conoy Town.  Source: Annals of the Susquehannocks, by Frank Eshleman, Lancaster, Pa., 1908, Page 239.  "In 1719, the Conoy Town, we learn, was a halting-point for warriors of the Five Nations, as they returned north from marauds against the Catawbas of Virginia and the Carolinas."

  Source: Names which the Lenni Lennape or Delaware Indians gave to rivers, streams and localities, within the states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia: with their significations; William Cornelius Reichel; H.T. Clauder, printer, 1872; Page 22.
 
 The Indian traders Peter Bezaillion (wife Martha), James LeTort, and Moses Combe (Martha's brother) were the first to have land surveyed close by the mouth of the Conoy Creek.  All three tracts were about 1.3 miles or more to the south of the creek's mouth, along the river.

  Source: Records of the Land Office; WARRANTEE TOWNSHIP MAPS {series #17.522}; Pennsylvania State Archives; Harrisburg, PA.
 
 West Conestoga Township created from Conestoga Township, both still within Chester County.  West Conestoga Township included land west of Pequea Creek.   West Conestoga became the "local" administrative territory covering present day Locust Grove.
 
 Peter's Road, an early Indian Trade path, named after its founder Peter Bezaillion, is established/recognized about this time.  "Conoy Indian Town & Peter Bezaillion", David H. Landis, Papers Read Before the Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol 37, No. 5, Lancaster, PA, 1933.  "It (Peter's Road) was the route of the Indians and Indian Traders and trains of pack horses carrying the freight of the Indian trade, and it was the main artery between Philadelphia and the west by way of (future location of) Logan?s ferry in Donegal.  This was later known as Galbraith?s ferry.? (Papers Read Before the Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol. 37, No. 5, Page 135.)  Old Peter?s Road reported as branching north from Downingtown, following old roads passing thru Ridgeville (Stackstown) crossing the  the Conoy creek at Erb?s mill, then on past Conoy town and up the river shore to Logan?s ferry and then from there the route led on up to Paxtang.  (Papers Read Before the Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol. 37, No. 5, Page 134.)

 
  James Logan receives a patent to operate a ferry on the river, to the immediate north of John Galbraith's (1714-1768) future patent.  "Conoy Indian Town & Peter Bezaillion", David H. Landis, Papers Read Before the Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol. 37, No. 5, Lancaster, PA, 1933.

 
  Thomas Wilkins, son of Robert Wilkins an Indian Trader, bought a farm at Conoy Creek and leased the ferry of James Logan.  The western side of the ferry crossed the lower end of an island owned by Joshua Lowe.

Source: A History of Lancaster County by H.M.J. Klein, Ph.d., 1926.  Thomas Wilkins died before Joshua Lowe received title to the lower end of the island.  Thomas Wilkins' will was probated 6 Mar 1746 (Lancaster County, PA Will Book J, Page 333).  Thomas Cox granted the lower end of the island to Joshua Lowe 2 Nov 1748 (Lancaster County Deed Book A, Page 39).  Thomas Cox had the island tract surveyed 19 Sep 1748 (A-70-171).  Today, the upper end of the island is known as Brenner Island and the lower end as Lows Island.
 
 John Galbraith, Jr. (1714-1768) takes out land warrant for 440 acres & allowances from the William Penn Family that spans the mouth of the Conoy Creek and borders on the Susquehanna River.  The tract extended about one mile east of the Conoy Creek mouth, as the crow flies, to abt present day Stackstown, where Peter's Road crossed the creek, near Patrick Campbell's Tavern.

   Source: Warrant No. 90, Warrant Registers 1733-1957, Page 74, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Bureau of Archives and History.


Galbraith, John Warrant Register

Galbraith, John Warrant Map

Galbraith, John Loc. Conoy Residence

Galbraith, John Will Abstract

Galbraith, John Biographical Comments

Galbraith Family Tree Notes
 
 John Galbraith (1714-1768) surveys eastern portion of his warranted tract (250 acres + allowances). This survey did not include the land on which the Haldeman Mansion was built, as the remaining portion of warrant, bordering on Susquehanna (land encompassing the Conoy Indian town), was reserved for the use of the Proprietors, i.e., the William Penn Family.

  Source: Survey Book A, Page 106, William Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Bureau of Archives and History.
 
 In  August 1742 it was reported to the Lancaster Court (2 D. 24) that a road begins (was laid out) at Logan's Ferry on the Susquehanna and proceeds almost due east by a line bulging northward about a mile and a half, to Conoy Creek, passing John Galbraith's (1714-1768) old field on the way; then onward 3 and 2/3 miles to the Donegal (Presbyterian) Church. The road extended further to Mount Joy.  The cutting of this road was first requested by inhabitants of Donegal Township in May 1739.  On that date the road was requested to begin on the Susquehanna at Davenport?s plantation, land, which Logan had actually patented in  March of 1739.

 
 Conoy Indians moved north to Shamokin, vacating their village at the mouth of the Conoy Creek. Source: "Colonial Records of Pennsylvania" by Elbert Hubbard, Page 72, cites letter from the Conoy Chief Old Sack.
 
 John Galbraith (1714-1768) surveys his warranted land again, this time the full amount, which measured 440 acres & allowances. Source: Survey Book A, Page 107, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Bureau of Archives and History.  This second survey included the land on which the Haldeman Mansion was built and the land where the Conoy Indian Town had been located, as well as the double stockade of the Shenk Ferry People.
 
 John Galbraith (1714-1768) patented the full 440 acres & allowances surveyed.

  Source: Patent Book A, Volume 11, Page 368, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission Bureau of Archives and History.

 
 Conoy Indians request compensation for Conoy Town lands.
 
 John Galbraith (1714-1768) & wife Dorcas sell 54 of their 440 acres to Conrad Wolff.  This is the portion of Galbraith's warrant on which Nissley Vineyards is located today.  Where Peter's Road crossed the Conoy Creek.  (See Lancaster County Deed Book S, Page 419.
 
 Conoy Indians request compensation for Conoy Town lands.
 
 
  John Galbraith (1714-1768) & wife Dorcas sell 54 of their 440 acres to Conrad Wolff.  This is the portion of Galbraith's warrant on which Nissley Vineyards is located today.  Where Peter's Road crossed the Conoy Creek.  (See Lancaster County Deed Book S, Page 419.

 
  John Galbraith (1714-1768) and his wife Dorcas granted 383 acres + allowances unto James Galbraith (1703-1786).  This conveyance and the metes & bounds are mentioned in Lancaster County, PA Deed Book D, Page 455.  James paid 1,200 pounds for the tract.
 
  James Galbraith (1703-1786) & wife Elizabeth (nee Bertram), of Lancaster County transfer 383 acres + allowances to Patrick Work of Lancaster County for 1,200 pounds.  Lancaster County, PA Deed Book D, Page 550.  Note: Patrick Work paid the same amount for this land as James Galbraith (1703-1786) paid to John Galbraith (1714-1768).  Patrick's brother James Work married Janet Galbraith, daughter of John Galbraith (1714-1768) & Dorcas Galbraith.

1760 Work Family

1760 Galbraith-Work Family 
 
  The Pennsylvania Gazette announces a Sheriff Sale in Donegal Township of 400 acres the 10th day of July next "whereon are erected dwelling houses, barns, Hop kiln, also a  Hop yard, a good meadow, and more may be made, a good orchard, the whole is under good fence, the greatest part of the land will bring Hemp, and is well timbered, and is pleasantly situated on the Bank of the Susquehanna River; there is a good stream of water running thru the farm, for any kind of water works .... late the property of Patrick Work, and taken in execution by John Zass, Sheriff." 
 
  John Barr, Esq.. High Sheriff transfers 383 acres + allowances (Patrick Work's property) to highest bidder Samuel Scott (1697-1777) for 1,950 pounds.  Lancaster County, PA Deed Book N, Page 11. 
 
  Samuel Scott (1697-1777), late of Rapho Twp., by his will, granted one-half of his 383 acres + allowances to his brother Alexander Scott and nephew Samuel Scott, son of his deceased brother Abraham Scott.  The will stipulated that should Alexander die without issue, then his share should be given to Abraham Scott's son Josiah Scott.

  Source:(Lancaster County, PA Will Book C, Page 469, will probated 21 Apr 1777.)  
 
  Melchior Brenneman (1714-1768) conveys to John Haldeman (1753-1832) two tracts of land to the south of Locust Grove.  One tract of 172.5 acres descended from a 210 acre patent taken out by George Miranda in 1738. This patent was to the immediate south of the Galbraith patent.  A second, smaller tract of 4.5 acres was part of a patent taken out by David McClure in 1738.  This patent was to the immediate south of Miranda?s land.  Both patents, like Galbraith?s bordered on the eastern bank of the Susquehanna. 
 
  Alexander Scott, et al. (Alexander Scott of Hempfield Twp. & wife Sarah, Josiah Scott of Washington Co., Samuel Scott of Donegal Co. and wife Rachel) grant to Samuel Patterson (1727-1820)  of Rapho Twp their one half of the 383 acres + allowances being one half the same property conveyed to Samuel Scott (1697-1777), deceased.

  Source: Lancaster Co., PA Deed Book DD, Page 206.  This deed indicates ?Bartram Galbraith (1738-1804) hath heretofore recovered by due course of law one moiety or half part of the aforesaid tract of land with the appurtenances against them the said Alexander Scott & Samuel Scott after the death of the said Samuel Scott (1697-1777) the Testator." 
 
  Samuel Patterson (1727-1820) of Rapho Township granted his one half of the 383+ acres to John Haldeman (1753-1832) of Donegal granted Toenship as recorded in Lancaster Co., PA Deed Book DD, Page 373.

John Haldeman (1753-1832)

Haldeman Family

Haldeman Family

Steman Research
 
  A Writ of Petition issued out of Lancaster, PA Court of Common Pleas pertaining to land jointly held by John Haldeman (1753-1832) and Bartram Galbraith (1738-1804) in Donegal Twp. measuring 451 acres + allowances.  Writ covering 246 acres + allowance, part of the larger tract as in proceedings of said Court of the Term 1786.  This information and metes and bounds of the latter tract being provided in Deed Book 7-636.
 
  Survey for Bartram Galbraith (1738-1804) (205 acres + allowances) and John Haldeman (1753-1832) (246 acres + allowances).  It was carried out based on a Nov 1785 Writ of Petition issued out of the Lancaster County, PA Court of Common Pleas.  Following the survey, in a Feb 1786 term the Court declared "John Haldeman vs Bartram Galbreath (sic) Partition made. Judgment that the partition made be and remain firm and stable forever." 
 
  John Haldeman (1753-1832) erected a grist mail and distillery (At first, lower part of the mill was used as a distillery) near the mouth of Conoy Creek and acquired a large estate.   "Conoy Indian Town & Peter Bezaillion", David H. Landis, Papers Read Before the Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol. 37, No. 5, Lancaster, PA, 1933.
 
 Reading Howell Map (portion covering Locust Grove Vicinity).R
 
  John Haldeman (1753-1832), prior to this year erected a distillery.  Extensive pens were connected with the distillery for fattening swine on the refuse grain.

  Source: ?History of Lancaster County, PA, with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men,? Franklin Ellis & Samuel Evans, Philadelphia, 1883 (reprint), Page 753. 
 
  A Pennsylvania Direct Tax (also called glass or light tax) lists the following Haldeman ground's buildings:  residence, new building adjoining, stone kitchen, smoke house, baik (sic) building, barn, mill, still house, saw mill, etc. The property contains 362.5 acres and is valued at $16,041 (including the mill).  Under John Haldeman's name an additional property is listed with a barn on 211.5 acres valued at $7,199.50.  This property is listed next to a John Musselman.  This tax data suggests the small stone building behind the Haldeman Mansion at Locust Grove was a kitchen as early as 1798 and the mansion house had three additions with the third addition added in 1811, as mentioned below. 
 
 Federal Style addition to the Haldeman Mansion completed.  Floor Plan of Mansion
 
  Professor Samuel Steman Haldeman (1812-1880) a noted scientist, author, and naturalist was born in the Mansion to Henry Haldeman (1787-1849) and his wife Frances Steman Haldeman (1794-1826). 
 
  Bainbridge was originally founded by Henry & John B. Haldeman (1779-1836) in 1813.  The latter?s contribution included the purchase of a ?(Martin) Shaffer Farm.  Their land contributions were north of Race Street.  These lands were on the portion of the Logan Patent that descended thru Henry Miller (Lancaster County, PA Deed Book GG, Page 238).  They laid out their town ?on the north side of the main street leading eastward from the river at the railroad station?.  Bainbridge was enlarged by adding Centreville, which bordered on the south side of Race Street.  Two blocks to the South of Race Street was Market Street, which ran due east to the Stackstown road, paralleling Race Street, which extended to the Stackstown road, as well.  The original Bainbridge had its own Market Street.  See the 1875 Atlas. Centreville was on part of the land that descended from the Logan patent thru Michael Graff, thru Bartram Galbraith (1738-1804), thru Jacob Hoffman to John Siple and John Smith Jr.  The latter purchased the land that was to become Centreville in 1813.

   Source: ?History of Lancaster County, PA, with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men,? Franklin Ellis & Samuel Evans, Philadelphia, 1883 (reprint), Page 754. 
 
  John Haldeman (1753-1832) of Columbia, PA and wife Mary granted to son Henry Haldeman (1787-1849) of Donegal Twp., Deed Book 7-636. Tract containing 8.25 acres, being part of the above mentioned 246 acres + allowances that John Haldeman (1753-1832) received out of the 451 acres + allowances that he and Bartram Galbraith (1738-1804) held jointly and was divided among them by a Writ of Petition issued 5 Nov 1785. This small tract contained a grist & saw mill. 
 
  Letter from Francis Steman Haldeman, first wife of Henry Haldeman, to her step-father James Armstrong, which, in part, describes the Locust Grove property.
 
  Melish-Whiteside Map (portion covering Locust Grove & Vicinity). 
 
  The Pennsylvania Canal's Eastern Division completed.  It opened in 1833, ran 43 miles (69 km) along the east side of the Susquehanna River between Columbia and Duncan's Island at the mouth of the Juniata River. The state originally planned a canal between the Union Canal at Middletown to the Juniata. However, the plan changed in 1828, when the state opted to extend the Eastern Division further south to connect with the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad at Columbia.

  Source: "The Amazing Pennsylvania Canals, 150th Anniversary Edition"; William H. Shank; York, Pennsylvania: American Canal and Transportation Center; 1986. 
 
  West Donegal Township crated from Donegal Township.   It became the "local" administrative territory covering present day Locust Grove. 
 
  Conoy Township created out of West Donegal Township.   It became the "local" administrative territory covering present day Locust Grove. 
 
  Henry Haldeman (1787-1849) granted by will to son Cyrus S. Haldeman (1825-1892) ? all the real estate on which I now reside containing about one hundred and seventy acres, more or less, with all the tools and fixtures belonging to the mill and the distillery?.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Will Book U, Page 688.  When Cyrus S. and his wife Elizabeth transferred this property to Horace Haldeman (1820-1883) in 1853, the deed included a description of the descent of the property from Henry to Cyrus S.  In this document, the property was indicated to have 189 acres, 40 perches neat measure.  Henry's will was mentioned as having been dated 8 Oct 1846.

  Source:  Lancaster County, PA Deed Book A, Volume 8, Page 628.

Letter from Cyrus Haldeman to Abraham Lincoln 
 
  Harrisburg, Portsmouth, Mount Joy & Lancaster Railroad branch opens between Columbia and Royalton. Source:  Pennsylvania Rail Road Chronology, 1850, March 2005 Edition. 
 
  John Haldeman and Cyrus S. Haldeman (1825-1892) announce sales of properties next to Locust Grove mentioning Locust Grove grist mill and distillery as "forming a market at your door". These advertisements are placed in the first edition of a new journal "Agriculture, Horticulture & Rural Economy", Vol. 1, Lancaster, PA, 1852, which was edited by their brother Samuel Steman Haldeman (1812-1880). 
 
  Locust Grove surveyed for Horace Haldeman (1820-1883).
 
 
  Cyrus S. Haldeman (1825-1892) of Conoy Township and wife Elizabeth granted to Horace Haldeman (1820-1883) of the United States Army for the sum of $30,000 all that certain mill, still house, messuage and tract of land known as Locust Grove containing 189 acres and forty perches neat measure.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book A, Volume 8, Page 628. 
 
  Sheriff Sale Announcement of Cyrus S. Haldeman's (1825-1892) Locust Grove property, including the mansion, grist mill and other building on 170 acres more or less. 
 
  Horace Haldeman (1820-1883) of the United States Army and wife Ann B. Haldeman granted to John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903) of Conoy Township "All that certain Mill, Still House, Messuage and tract of lands known as Locust Grove for 189 acres & 40 perches neat measure, exclusive of what lies between the rail road and the river.

  Source: Lancaster County Deed Book K, Volume 8, Page 459. 
 
  John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903) erected a steam sawmill at Locust Grove, near the mouth of Conoy Creek.  In 1859, it became the property of John Wiley (1800-1870). A water mill stood on the site of this long prior to its erection. Other selected information on John Wiley

  Source: Source: ?History of Lancaster County, PA, with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men,? Franklin Ellis & Samuel Evans, Philadelphia, 1883 (reprint), Page 753.
 
  John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903) of Conoy Township and his wife Susannah (1825-1915, nee Wiley) granted to John Wiley (1800-1870) of East Donegal Township 24 acres and fifty perches neat measure being part of the same premises and tract of land Cyrus S. Haldeman (1825-1892) and his wife granted unto Horace Haldeman (1820-1883) who with his wife Ann B. granted unto John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903).

  Source: Lancaster County, PA deed Book Q, Volume 8, Page 424.
 
 Scott Map (portion covering Locust Grove & Vicinity).

  Source: Map#50 - Map of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1858 (From actual measurements by Joshua Scott E. E. published by James D. Scott, Philadelphia.); http://www.phmc.state.pa.us.
 
  John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903) and wife Susannah (1825-1915, nee Wiley) of Conoy Township granted to  John Wiley (1800-1870) of East Donegal Township 149 acres and 13 perches more or less neat measure part of property Horace Haldeman (1821-1903) and wife sold to John Hoffman Smith.  This property description includes a steam saw mill and requirement that one-third of the mansion house be reserved for Margaret Armstrong Haldeman (1804-1867), second wife of Henry Haldeman (1787-1849), during her lifetime.

  Source: Lancaster County Deed Book T, Volume 8, Page 194. 
 
 Conoy & West Donegal Townships, Lancaster County, PA Map.
 
  John Wiley's (1800-1870) will directed his three executors, two being his sons, to sell his real estate at public auction.  His two sons Henry H. Wiley (1832-1897) and John E. Wiley (1834-1911) were high bidders and acquired ownership of the 132 acres and 133 perches more or less, being part of a larger tract which John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903) and his wife Susannah (1825-1915, nee Wiley) sold to John Wiley (1800-1870).  John Wiley (1800-1870), deceased, of Conoy Township, wrote his will 5 May 1870.  It was proven 14 Jun 1870.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book C, Volume 10, Page 446.  See Lancaster County, PA Will Book AA, Page 40. 
 
 Conoy Township, Lancaster County, PA.  Map 1  and  Map 2
 
  John E. Wiley (1834-1911) of Conoy Township granted his 1/2 share "of all that certain grist mill, steam saw mill, steam distillery, dwelling houses ? tract of land containing 173 acres and 63 perches to his brother Henry H. Wiley (1832-1897) of Marietta having descended to them thru their father John Wiley (1800-1870) being composed of two tracts one having been received from John Hoffman Smith (1821-1903) and his wife as recorded in Lancaster County Deed Book Q, Volume 8, Page 424 and the other in Deed Book T, Volume 8, Page 195.

  Source: Lancaster County Deed Book A, Volume 12, Page 299-302. 
 
 Conoy Township Map. 
 
  Margaret J. Wiley McAllister (1838-), Executrix for estate of Henry H. Wiley (1832-1897) on 1 Apr 1899 granted onto Benjamin F. Hoffman (1863-1935) a tract which was the same as (or included) all that certain messuage and plantation and tract of land called Locust Grove on which is erected a mansion house, stone grist mill, old distillery and other buildings situated in Conoy Township.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book M, Volume 31, Page 61. (1863-1935). 
 
  Historic Susquehanna flooding of Locust Grove.

  Source: ?Souvenir; Bainbridge Ice and Flood; March 8th, 1904 (including Middletown, Red Hill, Falmouth, Collins, Locust Grove, Billmeyer, Shock?s Mills, Safe Harbor and York Haven)?.
 
 Red Carpet Wedding at the Haldeman Mansion.
 
  George Longaker (1886-1960) and wife Anna S. of Pottstown, Montgomery County, PA  granted to John Orth Trustee in Bankruptcy of Benjamin F. Hoffman (1863-1935) all that certain messuage and plantation and tract of land called Locust Grove on which is erected a mansion house, stone grist mill, old distillery and other ... containing 40 acres and ninety perches neat measure being the same premises which Margaret J. Wiley McAllister, Executrix for estate of Henry H. Wiley on 1 Apr 1899 granted onto Benjamin F. Hoffman.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book M, Volume 31, Page 61. Note:  More research is needed to determine by what means George & Anna Longaker held title to the Haldmen Mansion property.  Anna was George's second wife.  His first wife was Olivia Hoffman (1889-1918), daughter of Benjamin. 
 
  Growing Up in the Haldeman Mansion from 1934-1950.  Memoirs of Loman L. McCurdy (c1930-2009).
 
  John Orth, Trustee in Bankruptcy of Benjamin F. Hoffman (1863-1935) conveyed to J. E. Baker Company all that certain messuage and plantation and tract of land called Locust Grove on which is erected a mansion house, stone grist mill, old distillery and other ... containing 40 acres and ninety perches neat measure.  History of J E Baker Company.

  Source: Lancaster Co., PA Deed Book S, Volume 31, Page 539. 
 
  Aerial photo of Locust Grove depicting features as recalled in the Memoir of Loman L. McCurdy (1930-2009) who's family lived in the mansion 1934-50. 
 
 J. E. Baker Company Stockholders' Trustees granted to the J. E. Baker Company all that certain messuage and plantation and tract of land called Locust Grove on which is erected a mansion house, stone grist mill, old distillery and other ... containing 40 acres and ninety perches neat measure.  Being the same premises which J. E. Baker Company by its deed dated December 31, 1941 intended to be recorded. in trust to sell.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book M, Volume 35, Page 102.
 
  J. E. Baker Company granted to William H. Bernhisel (1920-2009) and wife Elsie M. (nee Derr) of East Donegal Township all that certain tract of land with a two and one-half (story) stone dwelling house ... known as Locust Grove containing 2.648 acres being part of Tract No. 2 described in Lancaster County, PA Deed Book M, Volume 35, Page 102.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book K, Volume 41, Page 209. 
 
 Aerial photo of Locust Grove.
 
 William H. Bernhisel (1920-2009) and wife Elsie M. (nee Derr) of York County granted to Christian E. McMurtrie of Lancaster Township, Lancaster County, PA all that certain tract of land with a two and one-half (story) stone dwelling house ... known as Locust Grove containing 2.648 acres.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book G, Volume 53, Page 24.
 
 Christian E. McMurtrie of Lancaster Township, Lancaster County, PA granted to the J. E. Baker Company all that certain tract of land with a two and one-half (story) stone dwelling house ... known as Locust Grove containing 2.648 acres.  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book G, Volume 53, Page 28.
 
 Mansion property rented to the Haldeman Mansion Preservation Society for $1.00 per year by the J. E. Baker Company under a project supported by the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County.  Richard Brooks of Bainbridge was the first President. 
 
 Aerial photo of Locust Grove.
 
 Mansion placed on the Pennsylvania and National Registers of Historic Places.
 
  J. E. Baker Company granted to the Haldeman Mansion Preservation Society 2.648 acres being same as premises which Christian E. McMurtrie conveyed to the J. E. Baker Company on 27 Dec 1963.

  Source: Lancaster County, PA Deed Book I, Volume 88, Page 429.

 Aerial photo of Locust Grove

Upcoming Events

Sunday, Aug 27 at 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Sunday, Sep 3 at 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday, Sep 6 at 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Saturday, Sep 9 at 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Recent Forum Posts

No recent posts

Newest Members

Follow Us

Recent Photos